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Floral clock (Frankfort, Kentucky)

The floral clock in Frankfort, Kentucky, is a landmark located behind the Kentucky State Capitol. Dedicated in May 1961 by Governor Bert T. Combs, the clock was constructed as a joint project between the state government and the Garden Club of Ke ...

Sheltowee Trace Trail

The Sheltowee Trace Trail is a 333-mile 535.91 km National Recreation Trail that was created in 1979 and stretches from the Burnt Mill Bridge Trail Head in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area in Tennessee to northern Rowan Count ...

Kentucky Air National Guard

The Kentucky Air National Guard is the aerial militia of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States of America. It is, along with the Kentucky Army National Guard, an element of the Kentucky National Guard. As police units of the Commonwealth, b ...

Kentucky Army National Guard

The Kentucky Army National Guard is a component of the United States Army and the United States National Guard. Nationwide, the Army National Guard comprises approximately one half of the US Armys available combat forces and approximately one thi ...

Peter Hackett

Peter Hackett was born in approximately 1763 or 1764 in the English colony of Virginia. It is believed that Peter was the son of Thomas Hackett, likely of Montgomery County, Virginia. As a boy Peter was bonded out to Captain James Estill, in appr ...

Paleontology in Kentucky

Paleontology in Kentucky refers to paleontological research occurring within or conducted by people from the U.S. state of Kentucky. Kentuckys abundance of exposed sedimentary rock makes it an ideal source of fossils. The oldest exposed rocks in ...

Camp Joe Holt

Camp Joe Holt was a Union base during the American Civil War in Jeffersonville, Indiana, across the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky, on land that is now part of Clarksville, Indiana, near the Big Eddy. It was a major staging area for troops ...

Diamond Caverns

Diamond Caverns in Park City, Kentucky was discovered on July 14, 1859. The Caverns are open for guided tours year-round, Closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day.

Taylor Barracks (Kentucky)

During the American Civil War, Taylor Barracks was a military induction center in Louisville, Kentucky, for African-American troops, and after the war it was a United States Army base for both black and white troops during Reconstruction.

Transportation in Kentucky

Kentucky is served by six major interstate highways, seven parkways, and six bypasses and spurs. The parkways were originally toll roads, but on November 22, 2006, Governor Ernie Fletcher ended the toll charges on the William H. Natcher Parkway a ...

Paris Pike

Paris Pike is the local name for the 14 mile stretch of U.S. Routes 27/68 between Paris and Lexington, Kentucky. For many years, this stretch of road only had two parallel lanes and a dividing strip. Given the large number of cars and agricultura ...

Vehicle registration plates of Kentucky

In 1956, the United States, Canada, and Mexico came to an agreement with the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the Automobile Manufacturers Association and the National Safety Council that standardized the size for license pla ...

2008 Kentucky Republican primary

The 2008 Kentucky Republican primary took place on May 20, 2008. The only Republican candidates that were still in the race were Senator John McCain and Congressman Ron Paul. McCain was the presumptive Republican nominee, having already won enoug ...

Clinton College (Kentucky)

Clinton College was a Baptist college in Clinton, Kentucky established in 1873 and opening in 1874, until its closure in 1915. Originally a girls school called Clinton Female College, it became coeducational in 1876. The campus was eight acres in ...

Fort Jefferson (Kentucky)

Fort Jefferson was a town on the Mississippi River about one mile south of Wickliffe, Kentucky in southwestern Ballard County. The formal town was founded in 1858, however, in 1779, George Rogers Clark built a stronghold of the same name at the i ...

Kentucky Gazette

The Kentucky Gazette, or Kentucke Gazette, was the first newspaper published in the state of Kentucky. It was started in Lexington by Fielding and John Bradford in 1787, and continued into 1789 with the current spelling of the state. Currently, t ...

Kentucky Wesleyan Panthers

The Kentucky Wesleyan College Panthers are the athletic teams of Kentucky Wesleyan College, which compete in the NCAA Division II and the Great Midwest Athletic Conference.

Murray City Council

Murray City Council is the city council in Murray, Kentucky, USA. It includes twelve councillors and a mayor. As of September 2014, mayor Danny Hudspeth and his advisers Jeremy bell Robert Billington Linda cherry, Mike Faihst, Pete Lancaster, Dan ...

University of Kentucky College of Communication & Information

The College of Communication & Information is the communications, information, and media unit at the University of Kentucky. The college offers the following undergraduate majors: Communication, Information Communication Technology, Integrated St ...

Belmont Tower and Carillon

The Belmont Tower and Carillon is an iconic structure on the campus of Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. The Tower is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Belmont Mansion registration and is prominently feat ...

Gooch Creek Arch

Gooch Creek Arch is a natural sandstone arch in Rhea County, Tennessee. It is 45 feet high with a span of 78 feet, making it one of the largest arches in Tennessee. While the arch was first described by Wilbur Nelson in 1915, it could not be loca ...

Hill–Talley Bridge

The Hill–Talley Bridge is a bridge over the Obion River along the Obion–Lake county line southeast of Tiptonville in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It carries SR 21/SR 22.

Sewanee Natural Bridge

Sewanee Natural Bridge in Franklin County, Tennessee, is a 25 feet high natural sandstone arch with a span of 50 feet. It is essentially a giant sinkhole partially eroded to form a large stone bridge. A wet weather spring located behind the bridg ...

William Overton (Portland founder)

William Overton was a pioneer of the Oregon Country in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. In the mid-1840s he purchased the land claim, along with Asa Lovejoy, for the site which would become Portland, Oregon. Overton sold his share s ...

United States congressional delegations from Tennessee

List of members of the Tennessean United States House delegation, their terms in office, district boundaries, and the district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 9 members, with 7 Republicans, and 2 Democrats. ...

NWA Southern Heavyweight Championship (Tennessee version)

The NWA Tennessee Southern Heavyweight Championship was a short-lived title in the National Wrestling Alliance that was defended in Southern Championship Wrestling. It existed from 1981 to 1982.

NWA Southern Tag Team Championship (Knoxville version)

The NWA Tennessee Southern Tag Team Championship was a short-lived professional wrestling tag team title in the National Wrestling Alliance that was defended in Southern Championship Wrestling. It existed from 1981 to 1982.

NWA Tennessee Heavyweight Championship

The NWA Tennessee Heavyweight Championship was the primary championship in the National Wrestling Alliance territory promotion NWA Top Rope, based in Lebanon, Tennessee. The Championship was created in 2005 and was active until 2013 when NWA Top ...

Paleontology in Tennessee

Paleontology in Tennessee refers to paleontological research occurring within or conducted by people from the U.S. state of Tennessee. During the early part of the Paleozoic era, Tennessee was covered by a warm, shallow sea. This sea was home to ...

Monteagle Mountain

Monteagle Mountain is the local name given to a stretch of Interstate 24 near Monteagle, Tennessee that passes over the Cumberland Plateau. Being part of the plateau, it is not technically a mountain, but appears that way to motorists crossing ov ...

Vehicle registration plates of Tennessee

The U.S. state of Tennessee first required its residents to register their motor vehicles in 1905. Registrants provided their own license plates for display until 1915, when the state began to issue plates. Plates are currently issued by the Vehi ...

The Bailey Brothers and the Happy Valley Boys

The Bailey Brothers and the Happy Valley Boys were an American bluegrass act widely considered to be among the first to cultivate the duo harmony vocal technique widely used in modern bluegrass music today. Charlie Bailey began his musical career ...

Chester Inn

The Chester Inn State Historic Site is a former inn on the Great Stage Road at 116 West Main Street in Jonesborough, Tennessee. It was opened in 1797 by Dr. William P. Chester. It was the best hotel in the Tennessee frontier area. Owned by Tennes ...

Cumberland Association

The Cumberland Association was a legal governing body formed in 1780 to establish the efficient government of the early settlers along the Cumberland River in the area of what is now Nashville, Tennessee. The association was formed upon the signi ...

Duck River Cache

The Duck River Cache was the archaeological discovery of 46 Native American artifacts by a worker on a farm in Western Tennessee in 1894. It has been called "perhaps the most spectacular single collection of prehistoric Native American art ever d ...

Ellington Agricultural Center

The Ellington Agricultural Center is an agricultural center in Nashville, Tennessee, USA. It is home to the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, and the Tennessee Agricultural Museum.

Ghost Ballet for East Bank Machineworks

Ghost Ballet for the East Bank Machineworks, also known by its abbreviation Ghost Ballet, is a public art installation and modern sculpture at the east bank of the Cumberland River between Nissan Stadium and the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridg ...

List of federal lands in Tennessee

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, shared with Oklahoma. Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail, shared with Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina.

Ottway, Tennessee

Ottway is an unincorporated community in northern Greene County, Tennessee. It located a few miles off Tennessee State Route 172. It is the location of Ottway Elementary School.

Raines, Tennessee

Raines, Tennessee, was a southern suburb of Memphis, Tennessee, located between West Junction, Tennessee, and Oakville, Tennessee. In 1950 it had a population of 300. At some point after 1958 it was incorporated into the city of Memphis.

Robertson Island, Tennessee

Robertson Island is an island on the Cumberland River in Davidson County, Tennessee, USA. It is near its crossing with the Richland Creek. It is the biggest island between Old Hickory Dam and Cheatham Dam. It is close to the Tennessee State Penit ...

Ross-Sewell House

The land was acquired by George E. Rauscher, a businessman from Erin, Tennessee, in 1904. Shortly after, he built this house. It was designed in the Queen Anne architectural style. In 1920 the house was purchased by judge John William Ross. After ...

List of Alfred C. Finn works

Welling, David 2007. Cinema Houston: From Nickelodeon to Cineplex. Austin: University of Texas Press. Strom, Steven R. 2010. Houston: Lost and Unbuilt. Austin: University of Texas Press. Fenberg, Stephen 2011. Unprecedented Power: Jesse Jones, Ca ...

Lost Pines Forest

The Lost Pines Forest is a 13-mile belt of loblolly pines in the U.S. state of Texas, near the town of Bastrop. The stand of pines is unique in Texas because it is a disjunct population of trees that is more than 100 miles separated from, and yet ...

Texas Campaign for the Environment

Texas Campaign for the Environment is a grassroots advocacy 501 Non-profit organization that works on health and environmental issues in the state of Texas in the United States. TCE began when its founders parted ways with Texans United in 1991. ...

History of African Americans in Texas

African Americans formed a unique ethnic identity in Texas while facing the problems of societal and institutional discrimination as well as colorism for many years. The first person of African heritage to arrive in Texas was Estevanico, who came ...

Deer Park, Texas

Deer Park is a city in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. The city is located in Harris County and is situated in Southeast Texas. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population of Deer Park was 32.010.

Glenn Springs, Texas

Glenn Springs is an uninhabited place in the state of Texas, United States, which is of historical importance. The Glenn Springs area was a natural spring providing water for Apache and Kiowa routing the Grand Indian Crossing passage at Boquillas ...

Jefferson (proposed Southern state)

The bill that annexed the Republic of Texas to the United States in 1845 allowed up to four new States, in addition to the State of Texas, to be formed out of the territory of the former Republic of Texas. This was due to the fact that Texas was ...

Texas Special Police

The Texas Special Police were formed, along with the Texas State Police, during the Reconstruction Era administration of Texas. to combat crime statewide in Texas.