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Tehachapi Energy Storage Project

The Tehachapi Energy Storage Project is an operating lithium-ion battery energy storage system used for grid energy storage located at Monolith Substation of Southern California Edison in Tehachapi, CA. At the time of commissioning in 2014, it wa ...

EDB

EDB may refer to: Energy Science and Technology Database, maintained by the United States Department of Energy Entschadigungseinrichtung deutscher Banken Economic Development Board South Australia EnterpriseDB, an American software company Econom ...

NEP

New England Patriots, a professional American football team Network equipment provider, a company selling telecommunications products and services National Election Pool, a consortium of US news organizations NEP Group, Inc., a US-based televisio ...

Federal Rail Transport Agency (Russia)

Federal Agency for Railway Transport) is a federal executive body that exercises functions of rendering public services, managing state property, as well as law enforcement functions and safety in the field of railway transport. Roszheldor is a f ...

Reintroduction of beavers to Europe

The Eurasian beaver is the target of several species reintroduction programs in Europe. Historically, beavers have been trapped and hunted for their meat, fur and castoreum, to the point of near extinction.

Marine conservation zones in Yorkshire

The marine conservation zones in Yorkshire, were created in 2016 and 2019 after an extensive consultation, which drew criticism of the UK Governments plans which designated only 31 zones out of the projected 127 zones in 2013. An £8 million study ...

ECM

Electronically commutated motor Extra CMake Modules aka extra-cmake-modules on Xenial Electrochemical machining Electronic contract manufacturing Engine control module Error correction mode Enterprise content management Energy conservation measur ...

National action plan

A national action plan is a nationwide initiative which sets out proposed work in a certain area, such as: National Action Plan on Climate Change, an environmental action plan in China National Action Plan for Salinity and Water Quality in Austra ...

Marwa Dabaieh

Marwa Dabaieh is an Egyptian architect and professor of Environmental and Sustainable Architecture at the Department of Architecture at Aalborg University. She is a BioGeometry practitioner and architect in Zero emission and passive earthen build ...

Titas Gas Field

Titas Gas Field is a natural gas field located in Brahmanbaria, Bangladesh. It is the largest gas field in Bangladesh. From where, around 300 million cubic feet of gas is being extracted daily. It is a subsidiary of Bangladesh Gas Fields Company ...

E (disambiguation)

E, the country identifier for vehicle registration plates of Spain E or Eni, an Italian oil and gas company E-Mark, an approval mark for automotive products in Europe under the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations E, a Polish elec ...

FASER experiment

FASER is one of the eight particle physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It is designed to both search for new light and weakly coupled elementary particles, and to study the interactions of high-energy neutrinos. The experime ...

North American inland temperate rainforest

The North American inland temperate rainforest is a 7 million hectar disjunct temperate rainforest spreading over parts of British Columbia in Canada as well as Washington, Idaho and Montana on the US side. Its patches are located on the windward ...

1986 French Polynesian legislative election

Legislative elections were held in French Polynesia on 16 March 1986. The result was a victory for Tahoeraa Huiraatira, which won 22 of the 41 seats. Its leader Gaston Flosse remained President of the Government.

1982 French Polynesian legislative election

Legislative elections were held in French Polynesia on 23 May 1982. Following the elections, a government was formed by Tahoeraa Huiraatira and Aia Api, who had won 16 of the 30 seats in the Assembly.

Spree (disambiguation)

The Spree is a river in Germany. Spree may also refer to: Honda Spree, a scooter SpringSpree, the annual cultural festival of the National Institute of Technology, Warangal, India Spree film "Spree" Numbers, an episode of the television show Numb ...

James U Lemke

James U. Lemke was an entrepreneur, inventor, and physicist based in San Diego. He founded several companies and developed several magnetic recordings and internal combustion engine technologies.

Thierry Poinsot

Thierry Poinsot, born March 22, 1958, is a French researcher, research director at the CNRS, researcher at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics in Toulouse, scientific advisor at CERFACS and senior research fellow at Stanford University. He has been ...

V (disambiguation)

V number, the normalized frequency of an optical fiber V, a symbol for voltage, an electric potential difference in a circuit ATC code V, Various, a section of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System V engine, an internal combus ...

DCR

Device control register, a hardware register that controls some computer hardware device like a peripheral or an expansion card .dcr, a raw image format Decision Composite Residuosity in cryptography, see Computational hardness assumption Design ...

Highview Power

Highview Power is a long-duration energy storage pioneer, specialising in cryogenic energy storage. It is based in the United Kingdom and the United States. It has permission for a commercial-scale 50 Megawatt/250 Megawatt-hour plant in England, ...

DGA

DGA may refer to: Diglycolic acid Domain generation algorithm, a family of algorithms used by malware to obfuscate their original Command & Control servers IP address Dissolved Gas Analysis, the analysis of gases dissolved in dielectric oils from ...

Poison (disambiguation)

Poison Final Fight, a character in the Final Fight and Street Fighter video-game series Poison comics, a Marvel Comics heroine with toxic, poisonous abilities

Jellyfish bloom

Jellyfish blooms are substantial growths in population of species under the phyla Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Blooms may take place naturally as a result of ocean and wind patterns, ecosystem shifts, and jellyfish behaviors though their occurrence i ...

2008 in radio

February 23: FM Hatsukaichi begins broadcasting in the Chūgoku region of Japan. date unknown: Iraqi public radio station Aredo FM begins broadcasting from Baghdad. November 1: Big 106.2 is launched in Auckland, New Zealand. March 1: ADN Radio Chi ...

2010 in radio

March - Indian radio station Radio City launches its first internet station, Radio City Fun Ka Antenna. January - Radio Mashaal is launched; the new station is a member of Radio Free Europe in Pakistan, broadcasting in the Pashto language. It was ...

Republic Square (Austin)

Republic Square is an urban park in central Austin, Texas. Located in Downtown Austin, the park features a grassy area meant for festivals and events as well as shaded areas under live oak trees. The Austin Farmers Market meets at the square ever ...

Columbus Register of Historic Properties

The Columbus Register of Historic Places is a register for historic buildings and other sites in Columbus, Ohio, United States. The register is maintained by the City of Columbus Historic Resources Commission and Historic Preservation Office. Man ...

Eidgenossisches Schutzenfest

Eidgenossische Schutzenfeste are the Swiss federal shooting competitions organized by the Schweizerischer Schutzenverein since 1824.

John Ferdinand Smyth Stuart

John Ferdinand Smyth Stuart, known until 1793 as John Ferdinand Smyth and mostly after that as Ferdinand Smyth Stuart, was a Scottish-born American loyalist and physician who claimed to be a great-grandson of King Charles II. As the author of A T ...

Charles Nicholas Pallmer

Charles Nicholas Pallmer was an English politician, West Indies estate owner and a supporter of slavery. He twice served as a Member of Parliament, with his later career overshadowed by high debts and bankruptcy.

Sir Patrick Macgregor, 1st Baronet

Sir Patrick Macgregor, 1st Baronet was a Royal Physician appointed to King George IVs household. He was succeeded in his position as Serjeant Surgeon after his death by Sir Astley Paston Cooper Bart.

Sebsefa Kadın

Sebsefa Kadın married Abdul Hamid, and was given the title of "Sixth Consort". On 20 September 1782, she gave birth to her first child, a son, Sehzade Sultan Mehmed Nusret, who died at the age of three on 23 October 1785. Two years later on 11 Oc ...

Atahualpa (ship)

Atahualpa was a United States merchant ship that sailed on four maritime fur trading ventures in the early 1800s. In 1813, in Hawaii, the Atahualpa was sold to the Russian-American Company and renamed Behring or Bering. In January 1815 the Behrin ...

America Ground

The America Ground is the name of an approximately triangular area bordered by Robertson Street, Carlisle Parade, Harold Place and Claremont in Hastings, East Sussex, England. In the early 19th century, this was considered to be outside the bound ...

1812 Baltimore riots

The Baltimore riots of 1812 were a series of violent riots that occurred in the months of June and July of 1812 in Baltimore, Maryland. The riots were in response to a series of anti-war articles written in a Federalist newspaper by federalist st ...

Frederick William Moore

Sir Frederick William Moore, was President of the Royal Horticultural Society of Ireland, and Keeper of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Dublin in the period 1879-1922. The standard author abbreviation F.W.Moore is used to indicate this person as the ...

Islands of the Sun

Islands of the Sun or The Adventures of Iambulus in the Southern Ocean is a utopian novel by Iambulus which was written in Greek between 165 and 50 B.C.E. It chronicles the journey of the eponymous character Iambulus who discovers a seemingly per ...

Al-Mansur of Tidore

Sultan Al-Mansur was the second Sultan of Tidore in Maluku islands, who reigned from at least 1512 until 1526. Certain legends associate him with the beginnings of Tidores rule over the Papuan Islands and western New Guinea. During his reign the ...

Manchurian plague

The Manchurian plague, which lasted from Autumn 1910 to Spring 1911, was a deadly pneumonic epidemic that affected Manchuria, resulting in approximately 60.000 deaths.

Rampenloch

The Rampenloch is a street in the East Westphalian city of Minden in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. For a long time the street consisted almost exclusively of brothels. Today the brothels are gone and the street is to be redeveloped. ...

Memorial of Waterloo 1815

The Memorial of Waterloo 1815 is a Belgian museum complex located on the site of the Waterloo battlefield in Belgium. It includes a museum inaugurated in 2015, the Lions Mound, the Panorama of the Battle of Waterloo and the Hougoumont farm.

Court of Minstrels

The Court of Minstrels was a court held in Tutbury, Staffordshire for minstrels from the nearby counties. The court was founded by John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster who held Tutbury Castle, for the encouragement of the minstrels art and for th ...

William Seymour Jr.

Seymour was born in Albany, New York on October 2, 1818. He was a son of William Seymour Sr. 1795–1866 and the former Jane Bradt 1797–1832. His paternal grandparents were Truman Seymour and Zabiah nee Packard Seymour.

James Fairman

James Fairman was a Scottish-born American landscape painter, art teacher, art critic and military officer.

Telegraphen-Korrespondenz Bureau

The Telegraphen-Korrespondenz Bureau, also referred to by many other names was a news agency founded in the Austrian Empire in 1849 by Joseph Tuvora under the auspices of the Austrian government. It is a direct predecessor of the current Austria ...

The Empty Library

The Empty Library, also known as Bibliothek or simply Library, is a memorial by Israeli sculptor Micha Ullman dedicated to the remembrance of the Nazi book burning that took place in the Bebelplatz in Berlin, Germany on May 10, 1933. The memorial ...

The Three Perils of Man

The first surviving reference to the composition of The Three Perils of Man dates from November 1819, when Hogg indicated that he had completed a little over one volume. He seems not to have made much progress in the next nine months, and it was ...

William Fernihough

William Fernihough was locomotive superintendent of the Eastern Counties Railway from 1843 to 1845. He is noted for his work on the balancing of railway engines in particular the counterbalanced driving wheel

Mont v. United States

Mont v. United States, No. 17-8995, 587 U.S. ___, is a United States Supreme Court case concerning the proper interpretation of "supervised release" under 18 U.S.C. §3624. The case involved a prisoner who was convicted on drug distribution charge ...